CarersBlog

carersblog.wordpress.com

Carers Cannot Suffer Financial Cuts

Carers are already doing their bit

Long summer nights tend to bring out the wistful, romantic in me. What a wonderful world is on repeat in my head and I embellish my mood of serenity.

Then on the 21st/22nd June, the earth begins tilting away from the sun meaning shorter days and longer nights. It seems appropriate that the emergency budget outlining future spending plans will happen on 22nd June. The first day of the darker nights.

Our pre-election demand was that the £256m non-ringfenced grant given to English local authorities to support carers cannot be cut. And this was spared from the £6bn savings for this year announced a couple of weeks ago.

But, the financial cuts experienced by local authorities in other areas means that they will have to pull money from some areas to cover other losses. We are already hearing reports of our local Carers’ Centres and Crossroads Care organisations having funding withdrawn or greatly reduced.

I am wholly convinced that we all should “do our bit” – some of us will pay higher taxes and other programmes may lose out. But, what is clear is that carers are already doing their bit. If you take what little support they get away, they will fall over due to physical and emotional collapse.

And if this was to happen, there would actually be a bigger cost to this country.

Our latest report produces evidence that supporting carers is not only morally right but actually leads to better outcomes for people they are supporting and saves money in the long term. We show that by supporting carers, there will be:

  1. Less hospitalisation of stroke patients saving £3500+ per patient, per annum.
  2. Delayed entry into residential care of person needing care by over 500 day
  3. Improved hospital discharge processes that means freeing up beds

Money has to be saved but government and local authorities must look elsewhere because put simply, this country cannot afford to not support carers.

Take care

Gordon

Advertisements

June 7, 2010 - Posted by | Social Care | , , , , , , ,

7 Comments »

  1. Interesting 1 \ 2 \ 3 …. ” Saves money “.

    Should add at the expense of the carer … how much more burdens can each of us shoulder , many on 25% LESS than JSA , others excluded from Carers Pittance.

    Cart \ horses …. such matters cannot be treated in isolation WITHOUT researching the likely effect on carers.

    Don’t encourage the Powers To Be too much …. it could backfire on all carers despite our leading charities welcoming such proposals !

    Comment by Paul | June 7, 2010 | Reply

  2. Hi Paul
    What our report shows is that because of the extra support for carers, the health of the carer is dramatically improved. The reduction in residential care admission is because the carer is healthier and does not need care or hospitalisation themselves.

    The reality is that carers are being dumped on. A lot of carers tell us that they want to care for their partner, parent, child or friend but get no support to do so. What we show is that supporting carers who want to care means they remain healthier meaning the person they support doesn’t need residential or hospital care. So this is good for the carer and the person they’re caring for.

    I hope I’ve explained where we’re coming from.
    Thanks Paul
    Gordon

    Comment by Gordon | June 7, 2010 | Reply

  3. At least we agree carers ” Are being dumped on “.

    Alas , the support you mentioned is usually a figment of one’s imagination rather than a reality.

    In many instances , and provided ” Someone ” is at home , the system releases a patient , and then washes it’s hands of them … ” Don’t bother us , you get on with it ” …. mirror images how I became a carer in the first place ( a sole , lone 24 \ 7 carer…. painfully going from £ 30K per annum to £ 49 odd per week in the space of weeks , and , thankfully , unlike many , managed to starve off insolvency over a ten year period after downsizing twice … leaving me facing the rest of my life near to the poverty line , living a room provided for my a close friend.

    Comment by Paul | June 7, 2010 | Reply

  4. “I am wholly convinced that we all should “do our bit” – some of us will pay higher taxes and other programmes may lose out. But, what is clear is that carers are already doing their bit. If you take what little support they get away, they will fall over due to physical and emotional collapse.”
    I have been doing MY BIT for 22 years and may very well have to for many years to come.

    When are the PEOPLE AND THE GOVERNMENT of this nation( whatever politcal party) going to wake up to the fact that without the MASSIVE CONTRIBUTION AND SAVINGS CARERS MAKE,no government or council could afford the care bill that woud follow.
    HOW ABOUT CUTING MP,S PAY AND PENSIONS AND INVESTING IT IN SUPPORT OF CARERS.

    NO MATTER WHAT HAPPENS TO THE COUNTRY AND ITS MONEY PROBLEMS CARERS WIL CONTINUE TO LOOK AFTER THOSE THEY LOVE
    IRRESPECTIVE OF THE COST IN TERMS OF
    MONEY AND TO THEMSELVES

    HOW MANY MP,S AND COUNCILLORS WOULD EVEN CONSIDER DOING
    THAT

    Comment by Taras Kurylak | June 7, 2010 | Reply

  5. Hi there, I like this article.
    I think it’s interesting and also informative at the same time.
    Looking forward for your next smart postings.

    Thank U 🙂

    Comment by Financial and Investment | June 8, 2010 | Reply

  6. If you read the blog Lake Cocytus on this general topic you will see that the SHA involved funded the PCT to implement the National Dementia Strategy but the money was used for other purposes. Now the Acute Trust has to make improvements with no specified funding resource. Shouldn’t the SHA be able to fine the PCT and give the proceeds to the Acute Trust.

    Comment by evergreen | June 9, 2010 | Reply

  7. The report confirms what we’ve always been saying. But of course it goes deeper.

    Personalisation – the new all-singing, all-dancing social care reform – actually expects more from carers whilst making it harder to obtain help because carers were never considered within that “brave new world” as anything other than a resource to be exploited…most areas have no clue how to support carers using personalised budgets because, of course, a personalised budget is about the service user. If anyone knows of any good examples, I really could use seeing a few as I’ve not come across one yet.

    Comment by charles47 | June 10, 2010 | Reply


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: