CarersBlog

carersblog.wordpress.com

40th Anniversary of the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act (1970)

Today is the 40th anniversary of the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act (1970) coming into effect. This was the first placing legally requiring authorities regarding their duties to ill and disabled people. It was Alf Morris MP (now The Lord Morris of Manchester), a relatively new and backbench MP, who introduced the Bill in 1969.

The key points of the Bill were:

  • Rights of access for disabled people to the built environment, including schools and universities
  • The world’s first statutory provision for purpose-built housing for disabled people and help in adapting their homes
  • Practical help as of right for disabled people in their homes, including the installation of telephone for those house-bound, an access to transport and other services outside the home
  • The world’s first recognition in law of autism and dyslexia
  • The world’s first legislation for the needs of children who are both blind and pre-lingually deaf
  • The world’s first Institute of Hearing Research

    Working against time with an election looming which halts any legislation from being passed, Lord Morris drafted the Bill himself in three weeks and secured a second reading. This was a huge feat in itself. But our backbench hero went one further and mobilised a wide range of support in Parliament meaning it got passed on the last day before Parliament dissolved for a General Election. He had done it. He remains a fighter for this cause and an active Patron of Crossroads Care.

    This was the first such law in the world and since then, over 180 countries have adopted similar legislation. A service to mark this momentous occasion was held at Westminster Abbey today. Lord Morris was there to repeat the very words he used to commend his Bill to the House of Commons, which I will leave you with:

    “If we could bequeath one precious gift to posterity, I would choose a society in which there is genuine compassion for long-term sick and disabled people; where understanding is unostentatious and sincere; where needs come before means; where if years cannot be added to their lives, at least life can be added to their years; where the mobility of disabled people is restricted only be the bounds of technical progress and discovery; where they have the fundamental right to participate in industry and society according to ability; where social preventable distress is unknown; and where no one has cause to be ill at ease because of her or his disability.”

    Gordon

    Advertisements

    March 30, 2011 - Posted by | Health, Law | , , , ,

    3 Comments »

    1. Wise man, Lord Morris. Sad that his words seem to have fallen on deaf ears recently.

      Comment by charles47 | March 31, 2011 | Reply

    2. “If we could bequeath one precious gift to posterity, I would choose a society in which there is genuine compassion for long-term sick and disabled people; where understanding is unostentatious and sincere; where needs come before means; where if years cannot be added to their lives, at least life can be added to their years; where the mobility of disabled people is restricted only be the bounds of technical progress and discovery; where they have the fundamental right to participate in industry and society according to ability; where social preventable distress is unknown; and where no one has cause to be ill at ease because of her or his disability.”

      These words are the the cornerstone of the recogniton of long term ill and disabled people to HEALTH HOPE AND HAPPINESS.
      I have been a CARER for 25 years and i wonder when such legislation will be passed to recognise and help CARERS who have become a forgotten slave army that neither STATE nor PEOPLE want to recognise with real legal protection and help like the
      “the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act (1970) ”
      I LIVE IN HOPE !!!!!!!!!!!

      Comment by Taras Kurylak | March 31, 2011 | Reply

      • Very apt !

        The only release for any carer is on the death of their caree. For many , they may even pre decease their caree , especially those caring for younger family members.

        All the while they are caring , Society itself turns a blind eye , charities alike little more than a cup of tea.

        So much for UK PLC , time for the receivers to move in ?

        Comment by Paul | March 31, 2011 | Reply


    Leave a Reply

    Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

    WordPress.com Logo

    You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

    Twitter picture

    You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

    Facebook photo

    You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

    Google+ photo

    You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

    Connecting to %s

    %d bloggers like this: