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The Number 10 Experience

Note: The following blog post has been written by Moira Fraser, Director of Policy at The Princess Royal Trust for Carers

“The Prime Minister requests the pleasure of your company…” came the invitation. What an opportunity to get carers Number 10issues noticed right at the top. So on Wednesday morning, determined to give it my best shot, I walked up Downing Street, said good morning to the policeman and  rang the brass doorbell. The door swung open ominously….

Around twenty charities were  invited to give their views on NHS reform. Some big household names, some tiny – a real mix, but few others with a real carer focus. Lansley opened the debate, later joined by Cameron and Clegg.

The Coalition Government is clearly in trouble with its health reforms, and I have to say I can’t see what’s in it for carers. They say it’s not about privatisation, but unless more thought goes in, the competition it will allow will end up with a focus on price rather than quality. You can’t provide decent carer’s services on tuppence ha’penny. It also means charities end up competing against each other – exactly what we want to avoid. And changing the boundaries of health consortia and making these different from local authorities will make it a lot more difficult to join up all the different services which are needed to support young carers and families with complex needs.

About an hour into the meeting, I took my chance.  I caught Andrew Lansley’s eye – he looked at me and nodded. Gulp. In what felt like slow motion, Cameron and Clegg turned and looked at me. Carers have been absent from the debate so far, I said, and you need to remember our vital role. With some notable exceptions, GPs often forget all about carers  and carers organisations. We need joined up working, and services which work together to support families  to make sure vulnerable people don’t  fall through the cracks. The Bill needs to help this happen, not hinder this.

They nodded and asked more about GP practices working with the voluntary sector. The GP present agreed that primary care sometimes forgets anyone else exists. They agreed the Bill needs changes to give more indication of how local arrangements should work but didn’t agree that consortia boundaries will make things difficult. As he left, the Prime Minister, said we will all need to work to make health and wellbeing boards effective, “to do things like making sure carers get the right kind of support”.

I think there are real problems with the Bill. I think there is a massive risk of carers being forgotten about in decision making processes. There may be opportunities for the voluntary sector, but if it comes down to price we will all lose out. I said my piece. They said they were listening. But did they hear?

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April 15, 2011 Posted by | Carers movement, Carers Strategy, David Cameron, Social Care | , , | 6 Comments