CarersBlog

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Too rich to care?

My last blog was about how the value of £10 is different for different people depending on what it enables them to do with it. Then comes research on America and Europe which shows that the richer you are the less likely you are to provide care.

The Kiev Economics Institute found that for every 10% rise in salary women will spend 36% less time providing care and men will reduce their input by 18%. This actually corresponds with research in the UK which indicated a link between earning and whether you give up work to care or not.

Basically, these projects suggest that if you can afford to pay for care then you are more likely to do so, and if you cannot then you are more likely to give up work to do it yourself. Money enables choice. So, should a priority for Government be enabling carers of all incomes to have choices?

Technically, social services should provide care to meet all needs of the disabled or seriously ill person, and should only reduce what they provide if the carer is willing and able to provide certain levels of care. However, the reality is that it is assumed that carers will provide care and social services will only top up on the care that the carer cannot provide.

One woman I know has a husband who has a serious condition. Social services told her that it would cost them over £100,000 p/a to provide care to meet his needs, and that they couldn’t afford this. And despite her being a successful professional, she could not afford to buy enough private care. The solution was that she gave up her job and the council provided support worth about £7000 p/a.

I believe the Dilnot Commission’s recommendations (see previous blog) would make purchasing care more affordable and therefore give more people greater choice about how much care they provide and how much care they purchase. At the moment, being able to choose is too dependent on how much money you have.

This also has ramifications for Government economic policy, which I’ll cover in my next blog.

Take care

Gordon

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August 26, 2011 - Posted by | Benefits, breaks for carers, Equality Bill, Social Care | , , , , , ,

6 Comments »

  1. ” I believe the Dilnot Commission’s recommendations (see previous blog) would make purchasing care more affordable and therefore give more people greater choice about how much care they provide and how much care they purchase. At the moment, being able to choose is too dependent on how much money you have.

    This also has ramifications for Government economic policy, which I’ll cover in my next blog. ”

    How many commissions have there been, how many times must CARERS state the TRUTH that this nation and its political parties are SPENDING PEOPLE LIVES not some kind of paper value on shares.

    I AM ASHAMED TO BE A MEMBER OF THE THE HUMAN RACE AND PART OF A SOCIETY THAT CARES NOTHING,repeat NOTHING FOR REAL CARERS WHO DO NOT HAVE MONEY AND POLITICAL POWER WITH WHICH TO TO BRING ABOUT REAL CHANGE.

    IT IS TIME FOR “CARERS” EVERYWHERE TO DEMAND FROM OUR MP,s AND THIS NATION ” A CARERS ACT” just like the ” DISABILITY ACT” SO THAT CARERS WILL PROPERLY RECOGNIZED AND BE PROTECTED BY THE LAW

    If you GORDON really want to do something then persuade those that you talk to to
    COME DOWN OF THE FENCE
    AND
    DO THE RIGHT THING

    Comment by Taras Kurylak | August 26, 2011 | Reply

  2. You’re spot on to say that money enables choice. Although it won’t ever give someone their health back, it certainly makes life easier. It is unfair that people needing care and those of us that give it have our choices limited by how much money we have, or indeed by how much money social services are prepared to spend on us.
    Like the lady you mention, I also gave up a well paid job to care, but my main motivation was to spend time with my husband, as at the outset we didn’t know how much more time he had, and I decided I’d rather have the time with him than the money. At the time I did a lot of soul searching wondering whether to give up work to care for him, or to carry on and pay someone else to do it. I’m glad I made the choice I did. But had we not been relatively well off I would probably not have had that choice, or it would have brought on a great deal more financial hardship than we have now.

    Comment by Carol M | August 28, 2011 | Reply

    • Hi Carol
      Thank you for sharing your experiences, as I think a lot of people will find it interesting to read the dilemmas that families can face. Despite the doom and gloom about us being an uncaring society, you are emblematic of mllions of people who want to and do care for friends or family. I think what we need to do is help these people who do care to find a balance between the levels of care they can and want to provide whilst enabling them to still have a life of their own.
      Thank you Carol
      Gordon

      Comment by Gordon Conochie | August 31, 2011 | Reply

  3. Carers Carers – I was actually looking for some where to make a comment. I’ve been a carer since a child. My Mum at 66 has her own health problems and has been the main bread winner for the family and carer for my Dad with Multiple Sclerosis now 73. We’ve done a good job, but she’s exhausted now. At 38 i don’t want to have to give up work to care for both of them and neither do they want me to. But whats the alternative?
    There is no help available apparently. No one to give mum a break. Just me in the evenings and weekends. Lifting Dad is now pysically hard work, and theres no help for that as ‘they’ can’t risk hurting their backs.
    Oh well,
    Tired carer

    Comment by Adele | August 29, 2011 | Reply

    • Hi Adele i know how you feel,i gave up work 26 years ago and since then its not been easy either. All i can say is this what you can and will do for your parents is PRICELESS,unfortunately in this society and country today CARERS like you and me are not appreciated or valued.
      May GOD watch over you and help you.

      Comment by Taras Kurylak | August 30, 2011 | Reply

    • Hi Adele
      A lot of carers feel that sense of having no choice and that everything is “on” them. I’m not sure if you have a local Crossroads Care scheme and/or a local Carers’ Centre near you, or whether you’ve already spoken to them.
      You can find your nearest Carers’ Centre at: http://www.carers.org/carers-centres/find-your-local-centre
      You can find your nearest Crossroads Care at: http://www.crossroads.org.uk/index.php?mid=21&pgid=141

      They may be able to provide some support or advise what services there may be that you can get support from.

      Take care Adele
      Gordon

      Comment by Gordon Conochie | August 31, 2011 | Reply


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